Best type of work?

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Best type of work?

Postby stevegarside » Wednesday 3 February 2010, 22:31

I have been looking at long haul work (which I prefer) or multidrop which seems more readily available hence the safer option to stick to. I know of dhl at east mids airport are looking for drivers soon and at business post in derby.

I wonder what would pay more?

Obviously any work is better than no work, but I would just like some opinions.

Any thoughts?

[faqtag best type]
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Postby slim » Wednesday 3 February 2010, 23:04

For a starter, multidrop. Regular money. Review long haul later.
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Re: Best type of work?

Postby dino » Wednesday 3 February 2010, 23:07

stevegarside wrote:multidrop which seems more readily available hence the safer option to stick to.


Multidrop is harder work that's why there is more of it about cos no one want's to do it.I looked into going back into it last year when i was struggling for work but the money is poo for the work involved if you can get same day work go for it.
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Postby MK BIKER » Wednesday 3 February 2010, 23:11

The best type of work is the one that pays and doesnt go bust before its pay day! :roll:
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Re: Best type of work?

Postby slim » Wednesday 3 February 2010, 23:45

dinoakaliam wrote: if you can get


Dino is correct. Your returns can be better with express work but acquiring continous work and as MK says getting paid for every job you do without default is less certain.

My point is. Multidrop ( and I don't mean subbing for a rip off empire builder who 'owns' several routes at a depot) is a much stronger guarantee for daily work and paid generally much earlier than the 60 days+ express work possibly does.

As a start up you must concentrate on your cashflow. Multidrop is hard work no two ways about it. If your unfit, you wont be for long.
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Postby jue » Wednesday 3 February 2010, 23:45

multi drop is good pay if you work for the right company and it is regular.
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Postby Stuart Moverley » Thursday 4 February 2010, 10:06

Multidrop is a pain in the bum and too much like hard work. Tried it for a week and didn't like it so went back to long haul.
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Postby slim » Thursday 4 February 2010, 16:41

Am I alone.

Why is it that most on here see multidrop/express work as black/white.

I have done both to death, and for many years.

Multidrop on set rounds gets easier and easier, its only the first few weeks ( for some a few months) that is difficult. If you have done it for some time you gravitate towards companies that pay well, and your experience of your local area becomes an asset to sell in future. You also get access to people who may use you in the future, build relationships, you might find a regular distance contract to switch to if your getting bored.

I was lucky to work around Heathrow and eventually build solid working relationships with other subbies which led to more work marrying both multidrop throughout London with specials as extras. This is a view on multidrop which isn't raised on this forum. Why should multidrop mean working one or two postcodes only? Why presume you can't sell an attractive rate locally? Especially if you live 20 miles outside a large city.
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Postby jue » Thursday 4 February 2010, 17:36

i cant understand why multi drop has got such a bad rep ? well i suppose i can if a company is paying peanuts for the job to be done. all you have to do is find a company that is paying the going rate and your half way there. :-)
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Postby steve jones » Thursday 4 February 2010, 18:08

I think i've said it before on here,Nextday is in a worse state than sameday right now.
Most of the nextday companies are closing the net on there self employed driver's,more drop's for less money.And with timed delv's upto midday i hav'nt got a clue how the driver is going to be able to sneak off to do an outside job.
Things change with time and nextday is a great example of that.
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Postby ray valentine » Thursday 4 February 2010, 18:41

Last time i did multi drop parcel delivery with a van i had 146 deliveries plus collections, it was good money as i was working for an agency and they paid me the rate for a class 1 HGV driver.
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Postby slim » Thursday 4 February 2010, 19:02

steve jones wrote:And with timed delv's upto midday i hav'nt got a clue how the driver is going to be able to sneak off to do an outside job.


In those circumstances, your right, you can't.

But the point I was trying to make is I sourced my multidrop work from several agents around Heathrow as did many other subbies, we mixed and matched, occasionally covering all of each others work when a special came along. We got a varied workload, and created strong working bonds which was useful when taking a holiday and needing good quality cover.

I realise that LHR is a hotspot (was) for courier work but after being on this forum for the last year I am still bemused by the black/white attitudes between multi/express. I live in Northampton, give me 100 small dels @£5 daily into London and I'd bite your hand off and I reckon most of you (knowledgeable) would too.
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Postby Rwill » Thursday 4 February 2010, 19:32

Sameday or Nextday?

Pallets, parcels, documents, mail or newspapers

Home deliveries, B2B, Line haul

Uk or Europe

Man & Van, removals, antiques, fleabay

Charity bag collection, scrap and recycling, waste

Poster rolling, events and exhibitions, technical courier, swap outs, point of sale.

Health samples, blood, organs, dead dogs, cats & people – live animals

Baggage reclaim, Excess baggage, Airfreight

Groupage, ADR, on board courier.

Days, nights, part time, full time, weekends

Which is best?

It’s the one that suits you, that has work available from someone who might pay you and that YOU work out you can make the living you want to.
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Postby stevegarside » Thursday 4 February 2010, 19:33

well, ive worked it out that for it to be worthwhile, I need 650 a week for multidrop over 5 days, and I will only take 275 of that.

Anyone better or worse that figure?
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Postby steve jones » Thursday 4 February 2010, 19:42

[quote="slim"]
But the point I was trying to make is I sourced my multidrop work from several agents around Heathrow as did many other subbies, [quote]




I'll use DHL Nextday as an example because i know it's true, Each DhL depot across the country are giving contract's to outside people they call service partners,that service partner has to bring in everything from vans to getting driver's the whole running of things if they fail the service partner gets fined by DHL.Of course DHL have taken the lowest bid so very little money left for that service partner to bring in decent driver and pay them decent money but im sure the service partner will have a phone full of numbers of drivers willing to work for nothing be it full time or just to cover overspills,im not sure if any of the other nextday companies have the same thing,but surely if this works for DHL the others will follow.

As you say the only way your going to make money in nextday deliveries now is by going straight to customer and offer them a shuttle service to London from northampton 20 or more parcels at £10 hit.
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Postby stressedred » Thursday 4 February 2010, 20:51

Slim use to be called Fatty before he did multi drop :lol:
i quite like multi drop now working for hdnl pulling £600 to £700 a week minus £100 fuel £30 insurances, i have my own round approx 100 to 130 drops a day up until xmas then the poo its the fan goes to about 180 but i just carry it over to the following day, come friday they poo them selfs and ask me to work saturday for parcel + 40%
like slim says it gets easier what took 10 hrs a first is now down to 6 or 7hrs
Guaranteed money in the bank the following thursday, no ringing for payment of invoices, to be paid waiting 30 45 60 days.
its easier work sameday dont get me wrong
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Postby Craig Souter » Thursday 4 February 2010, 22:57

I've done multidrop until it started hurting.

No question, the best way to earn steady money is multidrop - but for the right firm, and it really has to be in London, and you really need to know what you are doing.

The company I worked for had one bloke on the London overnights run - you couldn't get him off it with dynamite. He made around £1k a week. When he was on holiday, another regular did it, if he was off I got the job.

You need to know fine details to work London - like whether a drop will be "open" if you call before 9am, when to go past a drop because you know it is closed, whether you can afford to pass it because it will take you a long time to work back to it, and how to drive around in Soho...

That company had another driver who was good at London - they sent him off every morning with the sides of his van fully expanded - you couldn't get him to touch the overnights, he wouldn't do it.

You get into suburban stuff, you need to be doing 8 drops an hour to call it a good job. The Flash Harrys do 10-12, but they bring things back and leave a lot of cards. Rural areas are painful - you can spend 20 min dropping to a farm, a mile off the road then find the farmer to get a sig. And the boss is never understanding about those things. I gave up a round after two bad days - special offer in Farmers Weekly, outdoor halogen lamps on discount, every farmer for miles wanted them, every drop took 15 min or more.

At the same time as I was doing this work for about £1 a drop, my cousin used to do catalogue multis for Blue Arrow, 40p a drop and he was getting special treatment because the rate was 30p.

Know your area and hope the recipients are mainly industrial, and multidrop can be a good earner. Get a lot of mail order multis to domestic addresses and you have usually been rolled over.

LOL but one of the best tips you can give to a beginner - if you can't find your drop, ask a Tufnell's driver ...
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Postby slim » Thursday 4 February 2010, 23:37

Craig Souter wrote:You need to know fine details to work London - like whether a drop will be "open" if you call before 9am, when to go past a drop because you know it is closed, whether you can afford to pass it because it will take you a long time to work back to it, and how to drive around in Soho...



Often had anything up to ten pre 9's and rarely got off the Paddington slip till 8 delivering that lot was a right game of chess. If i'm honest I used to enjoy it. But not as much as the traffic on Soho's pavements :wink: Apparently they've shut Gt Chapel St into Dean St. , so no through route, that must be a real pain.
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Postby slim » Thursday 4 February 2010, 23:42

steve jones wrote:
I'll use DHL Nextday as an example because i know it's true, Each DhL depot across the country are giving contract's to outside people they call service partners,that service partner has to bring in everything from vans to getting driver's the whole running of things if they fail the service partner gets fined by DHL.Of course DHL have taken the lowest bid so very little money left for that service partner to bring in decent driver and pay them decent money but im sure the service partner will have a phone full of numbers of drivers willing to work for nothing be it full time or just to cover overspills,im not sure if any of the other nextday companies have the same thing,but surely if this works for DHL the others will follow.



having paid HDNL £200 mill to take domestic work away from them I'm pretty sure we shouldn't worry to much about them.
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Postby Craig Souter » Friday 5 February 2010, 00:58

@Slim - face it kiddo, anything between Soho Square and Shaftesbury Avenue is a pain. I used to carry an old folding ladies bicycle in the back, it got me out of a lot of holes as long as the parcel was not enormous; park on the single yellows in Wardour St and hope the wardens were asleep.

But the 9o'clocks are always a joke, if you have more than two. You wouldn't mind, but soo many should be sent as 10 o'clocks, if people had the naus to realise that their own offices do not open before 9. What really hurts is the fact that the company has to pay a £65 penalty if a 9'oclock fails - and some of them will pass it to you if you are a subbie.

Nothing hurts more than a punch in the wallet ...
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Postby slim » Friday 5 February 2010, 01:24

Craig Souter wrote:What really hurts is the fact that the company has to pay a £65 penalty if a 9'oclock fails - and some of them will pass it to you if you are a subbie.

Nothing hurts more than a punch in the wallet ...


Ouch. First time i've heard of this. I stopped in 2003 just when the handheld pda's were being rolled out. Writing times in gave you a little latitude, there were very few customers who didnt help out by putting 0859 instead of 0905.
Except the few who would roll in at 0910 whilst you been patiently waiting since 0900 "0900 please mate" and then write 0915....

Re the penalty, I don't suppose they let you fine them for a late trunker eh.
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Postby Chippie The Courier » Friday 5 February 2010, 11:20

stevegarside wrote:well, ive worked it out that for it to be worthwhile, I need 650 a week for multidrop over 5 days, and I will only take 275 of that.

Anyone better or worse that figure?


Better, I do 5 nights at 6 1/2 hours average and Sunday night with 3 hours.
720 total miles per week turnover £700 and net profit £490 before tax.
I now run a SWB Transit 280 and get 37.5 mpg with a 70% profit margin!

It can be done guys, you just need to measure out all your costs very, very carefully.
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