Cold weather - Items to carry with you

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Cold weather - Items to carry with you

Postby A KIRK » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 19:31

Ok I'm sure we have had a thread like this but I can't find it.

Anyway I think it might be an idea to have a list of items etc to have with you while out during the winter.

Please feel free to add, I shall start off:

Blanket/sleeping bag
flask of hot water
mobile phone charger
breakdown cover in force
Shovel - maybe maybe not
spare food in the cab
plenty of fluids for drinking
Check tryes,oil,water levels daily
ensure you have plenty of screen wash, cos if your like me your going though it as quick as fuel


Please add, as I know I have missed loads of items lol
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Postby JJ » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 20:41

Just a few more

You've got your hot water - so you need tea/coffee, sugar & dried milk. Also packet soups which are better still as they feed you and keep you hydrated. Drinking chocolate is another good one, (ovaltine if your spending the night on your own :cry: )

Extra clothing - a good windproof coat and leggings, boots and thick socks. Don't leave the vehicle unless you are close to home. stay with it as it gives you protection from the elements. Many people die just trying to walk for help, your better of inside, once wet you will find hyperthermia sets in. If you do find hyperthermia is getting to you STAY AWAKE AT ALL COSTS, you will be overcome by the feeling of warmth etc and it will make you want to doze. This is when DEATH occurs. If you get cold and shivering move about as best you can, move your arms, legs etc to keep circulation going. No Alchohol - a small amount will actually warm you as it starts to open the blood vessels which have been shut down by the brain to keep the available body heat at the body core (vital organs) any more than this will open the blood vessels right up, all that warm blood will shoot round your body and you vital organs will shut down, this is known as death.


Just a quick word on hyperthermia - 1st your cold and then shiver (normal) 2nd you get violent shivers (the onset is nigh) then the shivering stops and you feel all nice and cosy and want to drift off into sleep (Hyperthemia has arrived) next is DEATH. Followed by the sale of your van. STAY AWAKE

So back to the list

Themal underwear - very important, get undressed and put it on. No one is going to see you and the struggle will warm you up.

Tow rope
Bag of rock salt, available at builders merchants approx £3 for 25kgs.

Someone mentioned on the other list that the inner of a tent could be erected, good idea, helps keep warmer air closer to you.

Hat, scarf and gloves.

Walking stick, long one. Use as a probe to test the snows depth. For use in 3 point turns.

Several layers of thin clothing are better than a couple of layers of thick. Air is trapped between them and helps keep you warm.
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Postby Stuart Farrington » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 23:07

Good advice from JJ

I would get a decent sleeping bag too, it's worth paying good money for one thats designed to protect you very cold conditions.

I heard a truck driver on the James Whale phone in on Talk Sport a couple of nights ago who was explaining that when he is in Scadanavia the truck stops actually have power outlets and he has to plug the truck in, the power provided keeps his cab warm but also his fuel lines are heated so that he has no problems starting when he sets off on his travels again!
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Postby The Ferryman » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 23:13

Also remember to make use of what is lying around in the van.

Stick a newspaper to the insides of the windows with the condensation, paper is a good insulator.

Courier flight bags are ideal for an outer, windproof, waterproof, sleeping bag, traps the warm air inside. Remember to keep your head sticking out, though!

If you don't any of these, stick your feet in a plastic carrier bag, every extra layer you can get on can trap air and help you to keep warm.

Emergency foil blanket from your first aid kit, get it round you, it is an emergency.

What else is in there? Bandages, could be wrapped round your ankles, hands.

Hitch hikers can be a useful source of warmth, but you seldom see them when you need them!
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Slurp

Postby Anonymous » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 23:21

Cans of self heating coffee.
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Postby packet2pallet » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 23:28

Good advice ferryman.

It gets well cold up in Aberdeenshire. I can remember sking round the streets of Ballater when I was a kid. And that was in June!

Personally I wouldnt use plastic bags to sleep in. They will no doubt warm you up. They will also make you sweat. Due to lack of activity you body will cool down (which it does naturally when you sleep) the sweat will make your body cool down further. You will wake up freezing and feeling rubbish. and you will also risk hypothermia.

Heres one, slacken the laces in your shoes / boots. This increases circulation in your feet, thus producing warmth (alledgedly). :wink:

Cheers.

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Postby The Ferryman » Wednesday 30 November 2005, 23:37

In theory yes, but if you are so cold you need to put your feet in plastic bags, you won't be sweating.

I mean as a final outer layer, once you have all your layers of clothes, sleeping bag, travelling rug. etc, just as an extra insulation and windbreak.
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Postby Mike George » Thursday 8 December 2005, 18:19

Also, it's a good idea to keep the fuel tank topped up so you can run the engine to keep warm.

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Postby Anonymous » Friday 9 December 2005, 00:10

seriously best way is to sleep with as few clothes as poss.

A) your body when cold automatically increases its temp.
B) when you get up and put clothes back on you feel fine.

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Postby Anonymous » Friday 9 December 2005, 02:00

One thing i always carry this time of year if you carry a stove to make a brew.

Take a Hot Water Bottle with you, its great to throw it the sleeping bag before you bed down for the night.

Hopefully going to get a night heater fitted soon then i not bothered what temp it go's down to.


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Postby Mike George » Friday 9 December 2005, 07:39

And if you're in seriously deep snow, clear a space for the exhaust fumes to get out, otherwise you'll get more sleep than is good for you.

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Postby Anonymous » Friday 9 December 2005, 20:47

Here's my pearl of wisdom and it is serious.

Carry with you a clean pair of socks and a spare pair of shoes. Those old trainers you were going to throw out, keep them in the van instead. There is nothing worse than wet feet! If your feet are cold so is the rest of you. If you can dry your feet then put dry socks and shoes on, you feel so much better.

Keep a wooly hat with you also. Heat escapes through the head.
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Postby Anonymous » Thursday 12 January 2006, 02:27

I carry most of the above during the winter months. One thing I do carry is a couple of either British or American ration packs, they are excellent for this sort of use as they are not dehydrated and can be eaten hot or cold. they are boil in the bag meals so after they have heated, you have water for tea or coffee. Plus they come with all the food and drinks you need for 24hrs.
They are readily available on ebay at about 6 quid a pack plus postage.
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Postby Stuart Farrington » Thursday 31 August 2006, 21:46

Thought I'd revive this topic as it's starting to get cooler now and winter will still be upon us.

Anyway on another forum that I use (not a courier one) someone was going about those foil blankets that the emergency services use and I wondered if anyone had one, or where you can get them from?

My thinking is that if I got in a situation where I had to kip in the van in winter something like this might be useful to lay flat on the floor to act as an insulator. I think I will also be investing in a decent sleeping bag in the coming months too as you never know.
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Postby packet2pallet » Thursday 31 August 2006, 22:46

Foil / emergency /space blankets are rubbish....if you really need to kip in the van invest in a good sleeping bag.....feather filled.....and a mat for the floor. :wink:

It aint that cold yet though! :wink:
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Postby maverick » Friday 1 September 2006, 19:38

best investment i made was an ex army sleeping bag well worth it an warm as toast :lol:
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Postby packet2pallet » Saturday 2 September 2006, 21:53

maverick wrote:best investment i made was an ex army sleeping bag well worth it an warm as toast :lol:


Yeah. I was gonna mention the old "Green Maggot"......The filling used to be all feather....top bit of kit. :wink:
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Postby RCD UK » Sunday 6 January 2008, 13:29

stuartinlancashire wrote:who was explaining that when he is in Scadanavia the truck stops actually have power outlets and he has to plug the truck in, the power provided keeps his cab warm but also his fuel lines are heated so that he has no problems starting when he sets off on his travels again!


One Friday afternoon I arrived at a factory in Jyvaskyla (see where that is!) only to find that the job wasn't going to be ready until the following Tuesday. Bummer.

They offered me the use of one of their car park hook ups, but I explained that UK vehicles don't generally have block heaters fitted. The guy gave me a strange look, the kind which made me wonder if I'd grown a hideous third head during the night and I hadn't realised.

I was told to leave the my van running or it would freeze solid. So I did. For four days and nights, I left it ticking over in their car park.

I've also got an auxiliary (night) heater, which was kept on for most of that time.

I went into the local town and got myself a goose down sleeping bag made by Joutsen. It cost about £250, which seemed a bit extravagant at first. The woman in the shop said she and her fella had two the same, and that they used them to sleep rough in when they went camping in Lapland. This seemed like a good enough endorsement to me, and I have to say she was right: climbing into it is like regressing into the womb. Never had I slept so soundly in my entire life as I did that weekend.

I'm down in the Alps at the moment as it happens, near Lugano which is on the Swiss Italian border. There's plenty of snow here at the moment, all dealt with in efficient Swiss style needless to say.

I would add snow shovel in aluminium alloy, not polycarbonate blade. Ortovox make some excellent super lightweight ones with collapsible handles. And at least one set of snow chains for your driven axle. Two sets is ideal, but not always necessary. They're actually illegal in some countries but I carry them anyway as I'd still prefer to be able to get out of trouble even it was breaking the law. And you can get out of mud with them too, so they have more than one use. Guess how I found that out?

A gas stove too. Hot chocolate, not tea or coffee which will dehydrate you faster.

You can go on and on, but really it depends where you want to draw the line. If you're happy you can be comfortable for twenty hours in your van if you get stuck you shouldbe alright.

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Postby bramble43 » Tuesday 28 October 2008, 01:19

don't know about stuck in van, what about bike? went to cardiff and got back just after ten tonight, (i'm a secret member of a sexual identity crisis forum) freezing on the motorway.
Heated grips next purchase, just need to find some heated pants and i'll be ok
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Postby Anonymous » Friday 31 October 2008, 11:07

i never found heated grips any good,i used to have lobster gloves and barmuffs,i used to ware longjohns,leathers and if it was chilli id put my over trousers on wich kept the chill factor down,neck tube/buff thermal,i had a hien gerrick summit jacket wich was the dogs i just wore a teeshirt,thin roll neck and fleece jumper and was toastie,also before i had a flip helmet i used to cut up bibs or the draw string inner liners of the suicide bags,cut them in to 5/6 inch length gaffer tape them to the bottom of the helmet kept all the wind and rain out,the onlything i could never get/keep warm were my feet!...oh yea and a bmw k100lt helped too...far bigger and better fairing than the pan... :D also found strapping the topbox to the seat,oldskool,keeps weight balanced,andwith ur back against it keeps the draught going up ur back.
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Postby Anonymous » Tuesday 3 February 2009, 23:59

The sleeping blanket cannot be underestimated....being a soon to be ex-trucker and having spent many a night out in freezing conditions and having the night heater pack up, I went out and bought a sleeping bag that would be sufficient for temperatures down to -10 ....the best investment I have ever made. I always use to keep it rolled up in the cab just in case the night heater would pack up!

Another thing is to make sure you have a spare charger for your mobile phone, I have been in a situation where my mobile battery was going flat only to find the charger had packed up due to a broken wire....damned annoying that is to, and with the new phones being able to connect to the internet you can check on weather reports and road conditions etc whilst your waiting to be rescued!

A small gas stove and a mess tin is also good along with some canned food or a 12/24 volt electric kettle with some cuppa soups, as has already been mentioned, the stove is better though as it wont drain the battery!

Some empty bottles with lids are also good so you can pee without getting out in the cold, I used to keep an empty 4 litre water bottle specifically for this purpose, the larger bottle had a larger opening, no need to ask why :wink: and labeled of course lol

And if your a smoker...keep a few spare packets of fags in the glove box too, cus when your stuck and waiting you don't half go through em :D
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Postby Lone_Wolf » Wednesday 4 February 2009, 12:10

one thing that im sure everyone has forgot to list and you will kick yourself after reading this.....A TORCH and batteries......gona need one if you dont want to kill your car/van/truck battery...

also jump leads, a small but useful set of tools, a decent jack and a hi viz (long version) coat as they are water proof and VERY warm...also a warning light (battery powerd) so you dont kill your transports starting power...my van only needs 9V after the pre heaters to start but im sure bigger things need more so you need to keep your battery up an dnot use it...i carry a wind up camping light in my van...works perfectly...gets you warm winding it up to.....as for my torch..its one of them batteryless ones that you shake to get the power....also gets you warm....i also carry a head strap torch for use when you need your hands...very useful...

hope this is of some help....
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